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The precise origin of Meunier is still a mystery, but it is thought to have come from Burgundy. Ferdinand Regner, the head of the Wine Department at the Federal Office for Agriculture in Klosterneuburg (Austria), reckons that Meunier comes from the natural crossbreeding of Pinot Noir and Traminer.

 

However, genetic analyses by biologist Carole Meredith tend to contradict this theory. Indeed, Meunier seems to be the result of a mutation of Pinot Noir: it looks like the bottom surface of the leaves was dipped in flour, because they are hairy.

 

Meunier is grown extensively in France, and particularly in Champagne, where it is associated with Pinot Noir and Chardonnay to blend champagnes. Most of Meunier is grown in the Vallée de la Marne.

 

 

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The precise origin of Meunier is still a mystery, but it is thought to have come from Burgundy. Ferdinand Regner, the head of the Wine Department at the Federal Office for Agriculture in Klosterneuburg (Austria), reckons that Meunier comes from the natural crossbreeding of Pinot Noir and Traminer.

 

However, genetic analyses by biologist Carole Meredith tend to contradict this theory. Indeed, Meunier seems to be the result of a mutation of Pinot Noir: it looks like the bottom surface of the leaves was dipped in flour, because they are hairy.

 

Meunier is grown extensively in France, and particularly in Champagne, where it is associated with Pinot Noir and Chardonnay to blend champagnes. Most of Meunier is grown in the Vallée de la Marne.

MEUNIER / Tell us all